Thursday, February 19, 2015

Standardized tests for children who are culturally and linguistically different





Image result for different language
www.stlawu.edu

Assessing children with a standardized test is the most commonly used way in evaluating children’s academic progress during the school year.  The policy “No Child Left Behind” directs schools to evaluate whether children meet their grade level academic benchmarks.  Governmental support is follows the students’ and institutional scores.  This stimulates some institutions and its teachers to perform their best to attain strong growth and positive results.  Their intention goes down to all students including children who are culturally and linguistically different.   
  
Throughout the U.S., children are taking tests this week so that local ...
www.accuracy.org


Assessing children with standardized tests has been expanding. Now even younger children are targeted and assessed for school readiness, such as at the beginning or end of kindergarten.

... , illustrators to Obama: standardized tests turn kids off to reading
www.csmonitor.com



The children who are culturally and linguistically different from the majority are included in the standardized testing.  There are some issues on results.  The children who are from diverse background have difficulties understanding the problems, and they have trouble expressing their ability on these tests.  They are often over identified as having special needs because their performance on these assessments is limited due to their English language proficiency. 

To better understand this problem, I contemplated the relevant factors and influences from different aspects of Epistemology; Education, Geography, Sociology, History, and Anthropology.   



 

 

 

Epistemology

 

 

Perspective on problem

 

How the perspective illumines the problem/subject as whole

 

 

Education

 

Learning as developmental and governed by a liner and universal model of progress (Repko 152)

 

Views evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different through the developmental process

 

 

Evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different with standardized tests affect performance on their ability and decreases possibilities on developmental expectations

 

 

Geography

 

Understanding physical locations and their geographical traits

 

Views evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different as geographical phenomenon

 

 

Evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different with standardized tests convey different preparations, expectations, and outcomes depending on areas. 

 

 

Sociology

 

Understanding of social reality that people experience and are being influenced within the society

 

Views evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different as a sociological fluctuation and tendency

 

 

Evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different through standardized tests produce a gap in analyzing their subcultures and performance in society.

 

 

History

 

Understanding the trends and development  in chronological (timely) order

 

Views evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different as historical phenomenon

 

 

Evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different with standardized tests inquires about modification on evaluating methods that implies recent demographic changes.

 

 

Anthropology

 

Understanding complexity of cultures across all of human history, Anthropology draws and builds upon knowledge from the social and biological sciences as well as the humanities and physical sciences. (American Anthropological

Association)

 

 

Views evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different as a struggle of reflecting their cultural belief and background

 

 

Evaluating the children who are culturally and linguistically different with standardized tests hold limitations on understanding students’ various cultural backgrounds thus not judging their real ability

 

 

I believe each discipline contributes different perspectives on this complex problem and each perspective taking will allow participants to create common ground in order to seek the best solution for assessing the children who are culturally and linguistically different.   

4 comments:

  1. This is marvelous, Sohye. I am personally very interested in this issue, and I think you have demonstrated that an integrated approach to the problem could yield helpful analysis to help us serve students better, and more accurately measure their aptitude and ability. I am looking forward to your capstone, and seeing what direction you go in with your project as you work to bring together different disciplinary perspectives to improve education for children.

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  2. Great blog! Very insightful and hits home for anyone who has ever had to sit through arduous standardized tests, not just the culturally and linguistically different. I believe that a standardized test doesn't measure a child's abilities for the future, and it is terrifying to learn that this is how the government funds schools. My SAT scores told me that I would not go to college, yet here I am about to graduate. It is the heart of the child that carries them to learn and drive towards the future. I believe a new sort of test, if there must be one for those politicians to be satisfied, that tests for learning style and drive to learn. All in all your blog and chart were very insightful into a topic that I knew nothing about.

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  3. Great Post, Sohye! I always love hearing about your program of study and what you hope to accomplish as an educator. I think you picked very appropriate disciplines to examine this problem with. It is so great to think that you will one day be an educator who will advocate and implement testing accommodations for children who are culturally and linguistically different. Thank you for sharing this issue with us!

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  4. Very very very interesting topic of choice. I think you did a wonderful job in choosing the disciplines that are involved. When Chelsea brought up the point that you are going to "be an educator who will advocate and implement testing accommodations..." that was a powerful idea she said. I would be honored to send my child to a school that looks at education for every type of learner, and so everyone receives the help that they need. Great post!!!

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